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Volt \Μονάδα

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Volt


The volt (symbol: V) is the SI derived unit of electric potential difference or electromotive force

ΕτυμολογίαEdit

It is named in honor of the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827), who invented the voltaic pile, the first chemical battery.

ΟρισμόςEdit

The volt is defined as the potential difference across a conductor when a current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power. Hence, it is the base SI representation m2 · kg · s-3 · A-1, which can be equally represented as one joule of energy per coulomb of charge, J/C.

\mbox{V} = \mbox{W} \cdot \mbox{A}^{-1} = \mbox{J} \cdot \mbox{C}^{-1} = \mbox{m}^2 \cdot \mbox{kg} \cdot \mbox{s}^{-3} \cdot \mbox{A}^{-1}.

Josephson junction ΟρισμόςEdit

Since 1990 the volt is maintained internationally for practical measurement using the Josephson effect, where a conventional value is used for the Josephson constant, fixed by the 18th General Conference on Weights and Measures as

K{J-90} = 0.4835979 GHz/µV.

Υδραυλικό ΑνάλογοEdit

In the hydraulic analogy sometimes used to explain electric circuits by comparing them to water-filled pipes, voltage is likened to water pressure - it determines how fast the electrons will travel through the circuit. Current (in amperes), in the same analogy, is a measure of the volume of water that flows past a given point, the rate of which is determined by the voltage, and the total output measured in watts. The equation that brings all three components together is: volts × amperes = watts

Συνήθη voltages Edit

Nominal voltages of familiar sources:

Note: Where 'RMS' (root mean square) is stated above, the peak voltage is \sqrt{2} times greater than the RMS voltage for a harmonic signal (sine or cosine wave).

Ιστορική ΑναδρομήEdit

In 1800, as the result of a professional disagreement over the galvanic response advocated by Luigi Galvani, Alessandro Volta developed the so-called Voltaic pile, a forerunner of the battery, which produced a steady electric current. Volta had determined that the most effective pair of dissimilar metals to produce electricity was zinc and silver. In the 1880s, the International Electrical Congress, now the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), approved the volt for electromotive force. The volt was defined as the potential difference across a conductor when a current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power.

Prior to the development of the Josephson junction voltage standard, the volt was maintained in national laboratories using specially constructed batteries called standard cells. The United States used a design called the Weston cell from 1905 to 1972.


Εσωτερική ΑρθρογραφίαEdit

Πρότυπο:Siencepedia

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